Skip to main content Skip to navigation

FDA Releases Produce Safety Rule codified text in Spanish

Published on
https://www.fda.gov/media/137715/download

COVID-19 Q&A for the Washington Agriculture Industry

Sanitizing and Disinfecting Surfaces

A: The most important step is selecting a disinfectant. The EPA has developed a list of disinfectants for use against SARS-CoV-2 (virus that causes COVID-19) called List N. The list can be accessed at https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. From this list you can search for products which you already have on hand using the EPA registration number. We also have a video on our food safety channel walking through the use of this resource and example product labels to determine if they can be used to disinfects surfaces for control of SARS-CoV-2. If you are searching for a new disinfectant, you can search by active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite (chlorine), quaternary ammonium (QUAT) compounds, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA)) for products which have been reviewed to meet EPA's criteria against SARS-CoV-2. The EPA states that, "If you can’t find a product on this list to use against SARS-CoV-2, look at a different product's label to confirm it has an EPA registration number and that human coronavirus is listed as a target pathogen." Ultimately, some facilities may have different compounds they use for regular sanitization compared to disinfection of high touch surfaces for purposes of controlling for SARS-CoV-2. Once you have selected a disinfectant, follow the label instructions paying special attention to the appropriate dilution and contact time. It is important to consider if a surface is considered a food contact surface, as concentrations required for disinfection may require a potable water rinse after application.
A: A sanitizer or disinfectant will interact with soil, plant matter and any thing else it comes in contact with. If we would like to get the most activity towards inactivating microorganisms (like SARS CoV-2), we need to remove excess soil and plant matter through cleaning steps (washing with water only or detergent) prior to applying a sanitizer. For surfaces which are normally kept dry, we may preclean with an alcohol based sanitizer or disinfectant before a second application. Some surfaces do not get overly soiled and may not need to be cleaned before applying a sanitizer or disinfectant.
A: Yes, all of these surfaces would be considered high-touch and should be targeted for disinfection throughout the day. Each farm should consider the timing and frequency based upon tool use and how many people are exposed to that surface. You can find more information in the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries documents for Coronavirus (COVID-19) Prevention in Agriculture and Related Industries or Food Processing-Warehouse Coronavirus (COVID-19) Fact Sheet.
A: No, the EPA regulates all antimicrobial pesticide products, which is the category these compounds fall into (US EPA. 2020). The EPA has different requirements for products if they wish to be labeled as a sanitizer or disinfectant. Sanitizers will reduce bacteria, but is not expected to kill all bacteria present on a surface. Only bacteria will be targeted (not viruses or fungi) for this label claim. Sanitizers labeled for a food contact surface must result in a 99.999% reduction of the target bacteria within 30 seconds and a sanitizer for non-food contact surfaces should inactivate target bacteria by 99.9% within 5 min (US EPA 2012). Disinfectants have more stringent standards which must be demonstrated for product labeling and they can target other microorganisms beyond bacteria like viruses (US EPA 2018). This is why the same product can have different instructions on the label for sanitizing and disinfecting surfaces.
A: There are two different objectives that most growers, producers, and packers are trying to balance currently. The first is the food safety standards that have been in place as our foundation for preventing food contamination during production, harvesting, packing or holding. Food safety standards have not changed in light of COVID-19, but public and worker health protection expectations have changed. Producers will want to review their current policies along with guidance from WA State Department of Labor and Industries for the agriculture sector and/or for food processors and warehouses as well as  considerations from the WA State Department of Health, CDC, FDA, WSDA, and USDA-FSIS. They can then determine what current practices are already in alignment with the new guidance from L&I, as well as where they may need to change some practices. L&I offers free consultations which can be accessed at 1-800-547-8367 or DOSHConsultation@Lni.wa.gov.
A: There are several references to using a bleach solution in home to disinfect surfaces. It is important for a farm or food processor to understand that they must utilize products which have an EPA registration number, and follow the directions on the label for that product's use. The EPA has developed a list of disinfectants for use against SARS-CoV-2 (virus that causes COVID-19) called List N. There are several sodium hypochlorite (bleach) and peracetic acid (PAA) products on this list. The list can be accessed at https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. From this list you can search for products which you already have on hand using the EPA registration number. We also have a video on our food safety channel walking through the use of this resource and example product labels to determine if they can be used to disinfects surfaces for control of SARS-CoV-2. If you are searching for a new disinfectant, you can search by active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite (chlorine), quaternary ammonium (QUAT) compounds, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA)) for products which have been reviewed to meet EPA's criteria against SARS-CoV-2. The EPA states that, "If you can’t find a product on this list to use against SARS-CoV-2, look at a different product's label to confirm it has an EPA registration number and that human coronavirus is listed as a target pathogen." Ultimately, some facilities may have different compounds they use for regular sanitization compared to disinfection of high touch surfaces for purposes of controlling for SARS-CoV-2. Once you have selected a disinfectant, follow the label instructions paying special attention to the appropriate dilution and contact time. It is important to consider if a surface is considered a food contact surface, as concentrations required for disinfection may require a potable water rinse after application.
A: Disinfectants can be applied by sprays, immersion, wiping, and fogging. We would not consider any application approach superior. Compounds can be applied through a remote system with an evacuated room or with an applicator wearing all the necessary PPE with a hand held device. There will be a separate section on the EPA product label for fogging. Look at directions for any special steps needed for food contact surfaces. Some will reqiure any food contact surface to be covered or require a rinse after disinfection. The most pertinent aspect of fogging is assuring coverage to all areas which need to be disinfected. Work with a service provider who can apply the fog or train your team. Typically, fogging would be considered a supplemental step that can be triggered in response to certain events as other disinfection approaches, e.g. wiping or spraying down surfaces with a disinfectant, can be done more frequenly.

Desinfectar y Desinfectar Superficies

R: El paso más importante es la selección del desinfectante. EPA ha desarrollado una lista de desinfectantes para uso contra el SARS-CoV-2 (virus que causa COVID-19) llamada Lista N. Se puede acceder a la lista en https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2 (solo inglés).En esta lista puede buscar productos que usted ya tiene a mano utilizando el número de registro de la EPA. También tenemos un video en nuestro canal de seguridad alimentaria (solo inglés) que explica el uso de este recurso y ejemplos de etiquetas de productos para usarse en la desinfección de superficies para el control del SARS-CoV-2. Si está buscando un nuevo desinfectante, puede buscar según el ingrediente activo (hipoclorito de sodio (cloro), compuestos de amonio cuaternario (QUAT) y ácido peroxiacético (PAA)) para productos que ya han sido revisados ​​y cumplen con los criterios de la EPA contra el SARS-CoV -2. La EPA afirma que "si no encuentra un producto en esta lista contra el SARS-CoV-2, mire la etiqueta de diferentes productos para confirmar que tenga número de registro de la EPA y mencione el coronavirus humano como patógeno objetivo". Algunas instalaciones pueden usar diferentes compuestos para la desinfección regular, comparado con la desinfección de superficies de alto contacto para controlar el SARS-CoV-2. Una vez seleccionado el desinfectante, siga las instrucciones de la etiqueta, prestando especial atención a la dilución y tiempo de contacto adecuados. Es importante considerar si la superficie se considera que está en contacto con alimentos, ya que las concentraciones recomendadas pueden requerir un enjuague adicional agua potable.
R: Los sanitizantes o desinfectantes interactúan con la tierra, materia vegetal y cualquier otra cosa con la que entre en contacto. Para mayor efectividad para inactivar microorganismos (como el SARS CoV-2), debemos limpiar (lavado solo con agua o con detergente) las superficies antes de aplicar el desinfectante para eliminar el exceso de tierra y materia vegetal. Para superficies que se mantienen secas, podemos limpiar con un desinfectante a base de alcohol previo a la segunda aplicación. Superficies que no acumulen mucha tierra, podrían no requerir limpieza adicional previo al sanitizante o desinfectante.
R: Sí, todas estas superficies son consideradas de alto contacto y deben ser desinfectadas durante el día. Cada huerta debe considerar el tiempo y frecuencia de limpieza en función del uso y de la cantidad de personas expuestas a esa superficie. Puede encontrar más información en el departamento de Trabajo e Industrias del estado de Washington, Prevención del coronavirus (COVID-19) en la agricultura y otras industrias similares o Hoja informativa sobre el coronavirus (COVID-19) para almacenes que procesan comida.
R: No, la EPA regula todos los productos pesticidas antimicrobianos, que es la categoría a la que pertenecen estos compuestos (US EPA. 2020). La EPA tiene diferentes requisitos para productos etiquetados como sanitizantes o como desinfectantes. Los sanitizantes reducirán bacterias, pero no se espera que las elimine todas. Solo afectará bacterias (no virus u hongos). Los sanitizantes etiquetados para superficies en contacto con alimentos, deben presentar una reducción del 99.999% de las bacterias en 30 segundos, mientras que un sanitizante para superficies sin contacto con alimentos, debe inactivar un 99.9% de las bacterias en 5 minutos (US EPA 2012). En cambio, los desinfectantes tienen estándares más estrictos y pueden usarse para otros microorganismos más allá de las bacterias, tales como los virus (US EPA 2018). Es por eso que un mismo producto puede tener diferentes instrucciones en la etiqueta para sanitizar y desinfectar superficies.
R: Hay dos objetivos que la mayoría de los agricultores, productores y empacadores están intentando balancear. El primero son los estándares de seguridad alimentaria que se han establecido como base para prevenir la contaminación de los alimentos durante la producción, cosecha, empaque o almacenamiento. Las normas de seguridad alimentaria no han cambiado por COVID-19, pero las expectativas de protección de la salud pública y de los trabajadores sí. Los productores deben revisar sus políticas actuales junto con la orientación del Departamento de Trabajo e Industrias del Estado de Washington para el sector agrícola y/o para los procesadores de alimentos y almacenes, así como las consideraciones del Departamento de Salud del Estado de WA, CDC, FDA, WSDA, and USDA-FSIS. Luego pueden determinar qué prácticas actuales ya están alineadas con la nueva guía de L&I, así como dónde necesitan cambiar algunas prácticas. L&I ofrece consultas gratuitas a las que se puede acceder al 1-800-547-8367 o DOSHConsultation@Lni.wa.gov.
R: Hay varias referencias sobre el uso de cloro (o blanqueador) para desinfectar superficies en el hogar. Es importante que las huertas o procesadoras de alimentos comprendan que deben utilizar productos que registrados por EPA y seguir las instrucciones en la etiqueta para el uso dichos productos. La EPA ha desarrollado una lista de desinfectantes para su uso contra el SARS-CoV-2 (virus que causa COVID-19) llamada Lista N. Hay varios productos de hipoclorito de sodio (cloro) y ácido peracético (PAA) en esta lista. Se puede acceder a la lista en https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. En esta lista puede buscar productos que ya tiene a la mano utilizando el número de registro de la EPA. También tenemos un video en nuestro canal de seguridad alimentaria ((solo inglés) que explica el uso de este recurso y ejemplos de etiquetas de productos para determinar si pueden usarse para desinfectar superficies para el control del SARS-CoV-2. Si está buscando un nuevo desinfectante, puede buscar según el ingrediente activo (hipoclorito de sodio (cloro), compuestos de amonio cuaternario (QUAT) y ácido peroxiacético (PAA)) para productos que ya han sido revisados ​​y cumplen con los criterios de la EPA contra el SARS-CoV -2. La EPA afirma que "si no puede encontrar un producto en esta lista para usarlo contra el SARS-CoV-2, mire la etiqueta de diferentes productos para confirmar que tiene un número de registro de la EPA y que el coronavirus humano está listado como un patógeno objetivo". En última instancia, algunas instalaciones pueden tener diferentes compuestos que usan para la desinfección regular en comparación con la desinfección de superficies de alto contacto con el fin de controlar el SARS-CoV-2. Una vez que haya seleccionado un desinfectante, siga las instrucciones de la etiqueta prestando especial atención a la dilución adecuada y al tiempo de contacto. Es importante considerar si una superficie se considera como una superficie en contacto con alimentos, ya que las concentraciones requeridas para la desinfección pueden requerir un enjuague con agua potable después de la aplicación.
R: Los desinfectantes pueden aplicarse mediante aerosoles, inmersión, frotación y nebulización. No se considera ningún tipo de aplicación superior a otro. En lugares evacuador, los compuestos se pueden aplicar con sistema remoto o aplicador manual utilizando todo el equipo de protección personal (PPE por sus siglas en inglés) necesario. En la etiquita EPA del producto, habrá una sección independiente para aplicaciones por nebulización. Revise posibles pasos adicionales para desinfección de superficies que están en contacto con alimentos. Algunos casos requerirán que las superficies en contacto con alimentos sean cubiertas o enjuague después de la desinfección. El aspecto más importante de la nebulización es asegurar la cobertura de todas las áreas que deben ser desinfectadas. Trabaje con un proveedor de servicios que pueda realizar la nebulización o capacitar a su equipo de trabajo. Por lo general, la nebulización se considera un paso complementario en respuesta a ciertos eventos, así como otros métodos de desinfección, ej. Limpieza más frecuente de superficies.

Crew Management & Testing

A: At this point, this approach is not recommended for operations unless they are responding to spread throughout their employees. In these cases, the facility will be working with the local health department to coordinate.
A: If you have a thermometer that is designed by the manufacturer to take an accurate temperature reading on the wrist, it would be allowed.
A: There is no paperwork required. All that is required if you don’t take the temperature is to ask the employee if they took their temperature that day and if it exceeded 100.4.
A: They are definitely not employees, but operations should consider how they will manage visitors to the farm to maintain social distancing (assigning picking area or number of people allowed in) and minimize high-touch surfaces when possible (e.g. eliminate reusable picking containers). You do have to protect your employees so requiring the visiting public to wear a mask or answer screening questions would be recommended. You also do not have to provide the public with masks. For U-picks, they should consider how they will implement requirements identified in Proclamation 20-57 for other employees of the farm.

Worker Hygiene

Training and COVID Response Plans

Worker Safety- Masks & Other Barriers

A: Someone is considered to be working alone when they’re isolated from interaction with other people and have little or no expectation of in-person interruption. How often a worker is able to work alone throughout the day may vary. Examples of working alone include:
  • A lone worker inside the enclosed cab of a crane or other heavy equipment, vehicle or harvester.
  • A person by themselves inside an office with four walls and a door.
  • A lone worker inside of a cubicle with 4 walls (one with an opening for an entryway) that are high enough to block the breathing zone of anyone walking by, and whose work activity will not require anyone to come inside of the cubicle.
  • A worker by themselves outside in an agricultural field, the woods or other open area with no anticipated contact with others.
For more information about preventing coronavirus transmission in agricultural settings: English:   https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-000.pdf Español: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-999.pdf  Call L&I for a free consultation: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/preventing-injuries-illnesses/request-consultation/consultant-near-you  
A: The CDC has not made a recommendation if one is better than the other.  Disposable is just that and can be thrown away after use, a cloth face covering if the intent is to re-use must be laundered or washed regularly.  
A: No.  A plastic face shield can be used as a supplement to a cloth face mask but not as a replacement for a face mask or barrier. Face shields may be used on the jobsite if social distancing is not achievable and other physical barriers are not appropriate.
A: Facial Covering Guidance for Businesses: As of June 8, all employees are required to wear a cloth facial covering, except when working alone in an office, vehicle, or at a job site, or when the job has no in-person interaction. Employers must provide cloth facial coverings to employees, unless their exposure dictates a higher level of protection. Employees may choose to wear their own facial covering at work, provided it meets the minimum requirements. Businesses must also post signage strongly encouraging customers and clients to wear cloth face coverings.
A: Barriers block any direct path between faces. Any open air path between two people (around the barrier) must be greater than 6 feet. Barriers should extend upward to prevent coughing or sneezing over the barrier. Barriers must extend at a minimum 12 inches above the head of people using the barrier. The barrier must cover the full range of motion for the people relying on the barrier Ventilation patterns need to be checked to ensure fresh air is getting to all users and that air currents are not flowing around the barrier in a way that could carry contamination around it. Barriers can be useful even if they do not provide complete isolation, to enforce distancing and limit exposure. They must be solid, smooth, non-absorbent, and easily cleanable
A: L&I is currently developing a guidance document for Heat Stress as it relates to cloth face coverings. Continue to check the L&I site.

Pruebas y Manejo del Personal

R: A estas alturas, este enfoque no se recomienda a menos que estén respondiendo a la propagación entre sus empleados. En estos casos, el centro trabajará con el departamento de salud local para coordinar.
R: Póngase en contacto con un proveedor de atención médica local y su autoridad de salud pública local: https://www.doh.wa.gov/AboutUs/PublicHealthSystem/LocalHealthJurisdictions
R: Si tiene un termómetro diseñado por el fabricante para tomar una lectura precisa de la temperatura en la muñeca, estaría permitido.
R: No se requiere documentación. Todo lo que se requiere si no toma la temperatura es preguntarle al empleado si tomó su temperatura ese día y si superó los 38°C (100.4°F).
R: Definitivamente no son empleados, pero las operaciones deben considerar cómo manejarán a los visitantes de la huerta para mantener el distanciamiento social (asignar el área de cosecha o la cantidad de personas permitidas) y minimizar las superficies de alto contacto cuando sea posible (por ejemplo, eliminar los contenedores de cosecha reutilizables). Debe proteger a sus empleados, por lo que se recomienda que el público visitante use una máscara o responda preguntas de detección. Además, no tiene que proporcionar mascarillas al público.   Para los U-picks, deben considerar cómo implementarán los requisitos identificados en la Proclamación 20-57 para otros empleados de la huerta.


Hygiene del Trabajador

Capacitacion y Planes de Respuesta COVID

R: La nueva capacitación se encuentra en: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/safety-training-materials/training-kits#AgCOVID19   Requisitos agrícolas de COVID-19 Este kit de herramientas de seguridad y salud ayudará a los empleadores agrícolas a cumplir con los requisitos de educación de los empleados en la Proclamación 20-57 del gobernador Jay Inslee. Los empleadores deben cumplir con los requisitos agrícolas de COVID-19 y proporcionar materiales educativos adecuados en el idioma o idiomas que los empleados entiendan. Descargue los materiales del curso Requisitos agrícolas COVID-19 (en español): • Plantilla de kit de capacitación de requisitos agrícolas COVID-19  (archivo .ZIP)Plantilla de presentación de PowerPoint de requisitos agrícolas COVID-19 solamente Guía del instructor sobre requisitos agrícolas COVID-19Plantilla de plan de respuesta COVID-19 para la agricultura

Mascarillas y Otras Barreras Para la Seguridad de los Trabajadores

R: Se considera que alguien trabaja solo cuando está aislado de la interacción con otras personas y tiene poca o ninguna expectativa de ser interrumpido por una persona. La frecuencia con la que un trabajador puede trabajar solo durante el día puede variar. Ejemplos de trabajar solo incluyen:
  • Un trabajador que se encuentre solo dentro de la cabina cerrada de una grúa u otro equipo pesado, vehículo o cosechadora.
  • Una persona sola dentro de una oficina con cuatro paredes y una puerta.
  • Un trabajador que se encuentre solo dentro de un cubículo con 4 paredes (una con una abertura para una entrada) que son lo suficientemente altas como para bloquear la zona de respiración de cualquier persona que pase, y cuya actividad laboral no requerirá que nadie entre al cubículo.
  • Un trabajador solo afuera en un campo agrícola, el bosque u otra área abierta sin contacto anticipado con otros.
Para obtener más información sobre cómo prevenir la transmisión de coronavirus en entornos agrícolas: Inglés:   https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-000.pdf Español: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-999.pdf  Llame a L&I para una consulta gratuita: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/preventing-injuries-illnesses/request-consultation/consultant-near-you
R: El CDC no ha hecho una recomendación si una es mejor que la otra. La desechable es solo eso y se puede tirar después del uso, si la intención es reutilizar una mascarilla de tela, esta debe lavarse regularmente.
R: No. Un protector facial de plástico se puede usar como complemento de una mascarilla de tela, pero no como un reemplazo de mascarilla o barrera física. Se pueden usar protectores faciales en el lugar de trabajo si no se puede lograr el distanciamiento social y otras barreras físicas no son apropiadas.
R: Guía de mascarilla facial para empresas: A partir del 8 de junio, todos los empleados deben usar una cubierta facial de tela, excepto cuando trabajan solos en una oficina, vehículo o en el lugar de trabajo, o cuando el trabajo no tiene interacción en persona. Los empleadores deben proporcionar mascarillas faciales de tela a los empleados, a menos que su exposición dicte un mayor nivel de protección. Los empleados pueden optar por usar su propia mascarilla facial en el trabajo, siempre que cumpla con los requisitos mínimos. Las empresas también deben publicar carteles que alienten fuertemente a los clientes a usar cubiertas de tela para la cara.
R: Las barreras bloquean cualquier contacto directo entre rostros. Cualquier camino al aire libre entre dos personas (alrededor de la barrera) debe ser mayor de 6 pies. Las barreras deben extenderse hacia arriba para evitar toser o estornudar sobre la barrera. Las barreras deben extenderse a un mínimo de 12 pulgadas sobre la cabeza de las personas que usan la barrera. La barrera debe cubrir el rango completo de movimiento para las personas que dependen de la barrera. Los patrones de ventilación deben verificarse para garantizar que el aire fresco llegue a todos los usuarios y que las corrientes de aire no fluyan alrededor de la barrera de una manera que pueda transportar contaminación a su alrededor. Las barreras pueden ser útiles incluso si no proporcionan un aislamiento completo, para forzar el distanciamiento y limitar la exposición. Deben ser sólidos, lisos, no absorbentes y fáciles de limpiar.
R: Actualmente L&I está desarrollando un documento de orientación para el estrés por calor en relación con las cubiertas de tela para la cara. Manténganse al tanto.