Skip to main content Skip to navigation

FDA Releases Produce Safety Rule codified text in Spanish

Published on
https://www.fda.gov/media/137715/download

COVID-19 Q&A for the Washington Agriculture Industry

Sanitizing and Disinfecting Surfaces

A: The most important step is selecting a disinfectant. The EPA has developed a list of disinfectants for use against SARS-CoV-2 (virus that causes COVID-19) called List N. The list can be accessed at https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. From this list you can search for products which you already have on hand using the EPA registration number. We also have a video on our food safety channel walking through the use of this resource and example product labels to determine if they can be used to disinfects surfaces for control of SARS-CoV-2. If you are searching for a new disinfectant, you can search by active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite (chlorine), quaternary ammonium (QUAT) compounds, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA)) for products which have been reviewed to meet EPA's criteria against SARS-CoV-2. The EPA states that, "If you can’t find a product on this list to use against SARS-CoV-2, look at a different product's label to confirm it has an EPA registration number and that human coronavirus is listed as a target pathogen." Ultimately, some facilities may have different compounds they use for regular sanitization compared to disinfection of high touch surfaces for purposes of controlling for SARS-CoV-2. Once you have selected a disinfectant, follow the label instructions paying special attention to the appropriate dilution and contact time. It is important to consider if a surface is considered a food contact surface, as concentrations required for disinfection may require a potable water rinse after application.
A: A sanitizer or disinfectant will interact with soil, plant matter and any thing else it comes in contact with. If we would like to get the most activity towards inactivating microorganisms (like SARS CoV-2), we need to remove excess soil and plant matter through cleaning steps (washing with water only or detergent) prior to applying a sanitizer. For surfaces which are normally kept dry, we may preclean with an alcohol based sanitizer or disinfectant before a second application. Some surfaces do not get overly soiled and may not need to be cleaned before applying a sanitizer or disinfectant.
A: Yes, all of these surfaces would be considered high-touch and should be targeted for disinfection throughout the day. Each farm should consider the timing and frequency based upon tool use and how many people are exposed to that surface. You can find more information in the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries documents for Coronavirus (COVID-19) Prevention in Agriculture and Related Industries or Food Processing-Warehouse Coronavirus (COVID-19) Fact Sheet.
A: No, the EPA regulates all antimicrobial pesticide products, which is the category these compounds fall into (US EPA. 2020). The EPA has different requirements for products if they wish to be labeled as a sanitizer or disinfectant. Sanitizers will reduce bacteria, but is not expected to kill all bacteria present on a surface. Only bacteria will be targeted (not viruses or fungi) for this label claim. Sanitizers labeled for a food contact surface must result in a 99.999% reduction of the target bacteria within 30 seconds and a sanitizer for non-food contact surfaces should inactivate target bacteria by 99.9% within 5 min (US EPA 2012). Disinfectants have more stringent standards which must be demonstrated for product labeling and they can target other microorganisms beyond bacteria like viruses (US EPA 2018). This is why the same product can have different instructions on the label for sanitizing and disinfecting surfaces.
A: There are two different objectives that most growers, producers, and packers are trying to balance currently. The first is the food safety standards that have been in place as our foundation for preventing food contamination during production, harvesting, packing or holding. Food safety standards have not changed in light of COVID-19, but public and worker health protection expectations have changed. Producers will want to review their current policies along with guidance from WA State Department of Labor and Industries for the agriculture sector and/or for food processors and warehouses as well as  considerations from the WA State Department of Health, CDC, FDA, WSDA, and USDA-FSIS. They can then determine what current practices are already in alignment with the new guidance from L&I, as well as where they may need to change some practices. L&I offers free consultations which can be accessed at 1-800-547-8367 or DOSHConsultation@Lni.wa.gov.
A: There are several references to using a bleach solution in home to disinfect surfaces. It is important for a farm or food processor to understand that they must utilize products which have an EPA registration number, and follow the directions on the label for that product's use. The EPA has developed a list of disinfectants for use against SARS-CoV-2 (virus that causes COVID-19) called List N. There are several sodium hypochlorite (bleach) and peracetic acid (PAA) products on this list. The list can be accessed at https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. From this list you can search for products which you already have on hand using the EPA registration number. We also have a video on our food safety channel walking through the use of this resource and example product labels to determine if they can be used to disinfects surfaces for control of SARS-CoV-2. If you are searching for a new disinfectant, you can search by active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite (chlorine), quaternary ammonium (QUAT) compounds, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA)) for products which have been reviewed to meet EPA's criteria against SARS-CoV-2. The EPA states that, "If you can’t find a product on this list to use against SARS-CoV-2, look at a different product's label to confirm it has an EPA registration number and that human coronavirus is listed as a target pathogen." Ultimately, some facilities may have different compounds they use for regular sanitization compared to disinfection of high touch surfaces for purposes of controlling for SARS-CoV-2. Once you have selected a disinfectant, follow the label instructions paying special attention to the appropriate dilution and contact time. It is important to consider if a surface is considered a food contact surface, as concentrations required for disinfection may require a potable water rinse after application.
A: Disinfectants can be applied by sprays, immersion, wiping, and fogging. We would not consider any application approach superior. Compounds can be applied through a remote system with an evacuated room or with an applicator wearing all the necessary PPE with a hand held device. There will be a separate section on the EPA product label for fogging. Look at directions for any special steps needed for food contact surfaces. Some will reqiure any food contact surface to be covered or require a rinse after disinfection. The most pertinent aspect of fogging is assuring coverage to all areas which need to be disinfected. Work with a service provider who can apply the fog or train your team. Typically, fogging would be considered a supplemental step that can be triggered in response to certain events as other disinfection approaches, e.g. wiping or spraying down surfaces with a disinfectant, can be done more frequenly.

Desinfectar y Desinfectar Superficies

R: El paso más importante es la selección del desinfectante. EPA ha desarrollado una lista de desinfectantes para uso contra el SARS-CoV-2 (virus que causa COVID-19) llamada Lista N. Se puede acceder a la lista en https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2 (solo inglés).En esta lista puede buscar productos que usted ya tiene a mano utilizando el número de registro de la EPA. También tenemos un video en nuestro canal de seguridad alimentaria (solo inglés) que explica el uso de este recurso y ejemplos de etiquetas de productos para usarse en la desinfección de superficies para el control del SARS-CoV-2. Si está buscando un nuevo desinfectante, puede buscar según el ingrediente activo (hipoclorito de sodio (cloro), compuestos de amonio cuaternario (QUAT) y ácido peroxiacético (PAA)) para productos que ya han sido revisados ​​y cumplen con los criterios de la EPA contra el SARS-CoV -2. La EPA afirma que "si no encuentra un producto en esta lista contra el SARS-CoV-2, mire la etiqueta de diferentes productos para confirmar que tenga número de registro de la EPA y mencione el coronavirus humano como patógeno objetivo". Algunas instalaciones pueden usar diferentes compuestos para la desinfección regular, comparado con la desinfección de superficies de alto contacto para controlar el SARS-CoV-2. Una vez seleccionado el desinfectante, siga las instrucciones de la etiqueta, prestando especial atención a la dilución y tiempo de contacto adecuados. Es importante considerar si la superficie se considera que está en contacto con alimentos, ya que las concentraciones recomendadas pueden requerir un enjuague adicional agua potable.
R: Los sanitizantes o desinfectantes interactúan con la tierra, materia vegetal y cualquier otra cosa con la que entre en contacto. Para mayor efectividad para inactivar microorganismos (como el SARS CoV-2), debemos limpiar (lavado solo con agua o con detergente) las superficies antes de aplicar el desinfectante para eliminar el exceso de tierra y materia vegetal. Para superficies que se mantienen secas, podemos limpiar con un desinfectante a base de alcohol previo a la segunda aplicación. Superficies que no acumulen mucha tierra, podrían no requerir limpieza adicional previo al sanitizante o desinfectante.
R: Sí, todas estas superficies son consideradas de alto contacto y deben ser desinfectadas durante el día. Cada huerta debe considerar el tiempo y frecuencia de limpieza en función del uso y de la cantidad de personas expuestas a esa superficie. Puede encontrar más información en el departamento de Trabajo e Industrias del estado de Washington, Prevención del coronavirus (COVID-19) en la agricultura y otras industrias similares o Hoja informativa sobre el coronavirus (COVID-19) para almacenes que procesan comida.
R: No, la EPA regula todos los productos pesticidas antimicrobianos, que es la categoría a la que pertenecen estos compuestos (US EPA. 2020). La EPA tiene diferentes requisitos para productos etiquetados como sanitizantes o como desinfectantes. Los sanitizantes reducirán bacterias, pero no se espera que las elimine todas. Solo afectará bacterias (no virus u hongos). Los sanitizantes etiquetados para superficies en contacto con alimentos, deben presentar una reducción del 99.999% de las bacterias en 30 segundos, mientras que un sanitizante para superficies sin contacto con alimentos, debe inactivar un 99.9% de las bacterias en 5 minutos (US EPA 2012). En cambio, los desinfectantes tienen estándares más estrictos y pueden usarse para otros microorganismos más allá de las bacterias, tales como los virus (US EPA 2018). Es por eso que un mismo producto puede tener diferentes instrucciones en la etiqueta para sanitizar y desinfectar superficies.
R: Hay dos objetivos que la mayoría de los agricultores, productores y empacadores están intentando balancear. El primero son los estándares de seguridad alimentaria que se han establecido como base para prevenir la contaminación de los alimentos durante la producción, cosecha, empaque o almacenamiento. Las normas de seguridad alimentaria no han cambiado por COVID-19, pero las expectativas de protección de la salud pública y de los trabajadores sí. Los productores deben revisar sus políticas actuales junto con la orientación del Departamento de Trabajo e Industrias del Estado de Washington para el sector agrícola y/o para los procesadores de alimentos y almacenes, así como las consideraciones del Departamento de Salud del Estado de WA, CDC, FDA, WSDA, and USDA-FSIS. Luego pueden determinar qué prácticas actuales ya están alineadas con la nueva guía de L&I, así como dónde necesitan cambiar algunas prácticas. L&I ofrece consultas gratuitas a las que se puede acceder al 1-800-547-8367 o DOSHConsultation@Lni.wa.gov.
R: Hay varias referencias sobre el uso de cloro (o blanqueador) para desinfectar superficies en el hogar. Es importante que las huertas o procesadoras de alimentos comprendan que deben utilizar productos que registrados por EPA y seguir las instrucciones en la etiqueta para el uso dichos productos. La EPA ha desarrollado una lista de desinfectantes para su uso contra el SARS-CoV-2 (virus que causa COVID-19) llamada Lista N. Hay varios productos de hipoclorito de sodio (cloro) y ácido peracético (PAA) en esta lista. Se puede acceder a la lista en https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. En esta lista puede buscar productos que ya tiene a la mano utilizando el número de registro de la EPA. También tenemos un video en nuestro canal de seguridad alimentaria ((solo inglés) que explica el uso de este recurso y ejemplos de etiquetas de productos para determinar si pueden usarse para desinfectar superficies para el control del SARS-CoV-2. Si está buscando un nuevo desinfectante, puede buscar según el ingrediente activo (hipoclorito de sodio (cloro), compuestos de amonio cuaternario (QUAT) y ácido peroxiacético (PAA)) para productos que ya han sido revisados ​​y cumplen con los criterios de la EPA contra el SARS-CoV -2. La EPA afirma que "si no puede encontrar un producto en esta lista para usarlo contra el SARS-CoV-2, mire la etiqueta de diferentes productos para confirmar que tiene un número de registro de la EPA y que el coronavirus humano está listado como un patógeno objetivo". En última instancia, algunas instalaciones pueden tener diferentes compuestos que usan para la desinfección regular en comparación con la desinfección de superficies de alto contacto con el fin de controlar el SARS-CoV-2. Una vez que haya seleccionado un desinfectante, siga las instrucciones de la etiqueta prestando especial atención a la dilución adecuada y al tiempo de contacto. Es importante considerar si una superficie se considera como una superficie en contacto con alimentos, ya que las concentraciones requeridas para la desinfección pueden requerir un enjuague con agua potable después de la aplicación.
R: Los desinfectantes pueden aplicarse mediante aerosoles, inmersión, frotación y nebulización. No se considera ningún tipo de aplicación superior a otro. En lugares evacuador, los compuestos se pueden aplicar con sistema remoto o aplicador manual utilizando todo el equipo de protección personal (PPE por sus siglas en inglés) necesario. En la etiquita EPA del producto, habrá una sección independiente para aplicaciones por nebulización. Revise posibles pasos adicionales para desinfección de superficies que están en contacto con alimentos. Algunos casos requerirán que las superficies en contacto con alimentos sean cubiertas o enjuague después de la desinfección. El aspecto más importante de la nebulización es asegurar la cobertura de todas las áreas que deben ser desinfectadas. Trabaje con un proveedor de servicios que pueda realizar la nebulización o capacitar a su equipo de trabajo. Por lo general, la nebulización se considera un paso complementario en respuesta a ciertos eventos, así como otros métodos de desinfección, ej. Limpieza más frecuente de superficies.

Worker Safety and Protection

A: “Employers must ensure all employees keep at least six feet away from coworkers and the public when at all possible.”   “When strict social distancing is not feasible for a specific task, other prevention measures are required...[for example], supply and institute mandatory, commercially-produced facemask policy, such as disposable non-health care use masks. If facemasks are used it must be in combination with physical barriers or some other engineering and/or administrative controls.”   When strict social distancing is feasible: “Loose-fitting face masks or cloth face covers (like scarves and homemade masks) may be voluntarily worn by workers as a best practice measure to prevent the wearer from transmitting droplets from coughs and sneezes. It’s important to understand that these types of face covers do not prevent inhalation of fine aerosols and are not protective in close proximity. If this type of protection is used, it should be washed and disinfected daily. Homemade masks are not an acceptable substitute for social distancing.”   For more information about preventing coronavirus transmission in agricultural settings:   English:   https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-000.pdf Español: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-999.pdf  Call L&I for a free consultation: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/preventing-injuries-illnesses/request-consultation/consultant-near-you
A: “Employers must ensure all employees keep at least six feet away from coworkers and the public when at all possible.” “Suggestions for mandatory alternate protections for tasks when six-foot spacing is not feasible: -Use physical barriers between workers to block direct face-to-face transmission. -Use negative pressure ventilation in employee breathing zones at fixed work locations. -Supply and institute mandatory, commercially- produced facemask policy, such as disposable non-health care use masks. If facemasks are used it must be in combination with physical barriers or some other engineering and/or administrative controls.” For more information about preventing coronavirus transmission in food processing-warehouse settings: English: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-166-000.pdf Español: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-166-999.pdf Call L&I for a free consultation: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/preventing-injuries-illnesses/request-consultation/consultant-near-you

Seguridad y Protección del Trabajador

R: “Los empleadores deben asegurar que todos los empleados mantengan al menos una distancia de seis pies de sus compañeros de trabajo y del público cuando sea posible.” “Cuando el distanciamiento social estricto no es factible para una tarea específica, otras medidas de prevención son requeridas…[por ejemplo], proveer y establecer una política obligatoria del uso de mascarillas producidas comercialmente, como mascarillas desechables de uso no médico. Si se usan estas mascarillas, deben estar en combinación con barreras físicas o algún otro control de ingeniería y/o administrativo. “Cuando el distanciamiento social estricto es factible: “Los trabajadores pueden usar voluntariamente mascarillas holgadas o cubiertas faciales de tela (como bufandas y mascarillas hechas en casa) como medida recomendada para prevenir que el usuario transmita gotas de saliva producto de la tos y estornudos. Es importante entender que estos tipos de cubiertas faciales no evitan la inhalación de partículas finas y no protegen en distancias cortas. Si se usa este tipo de protección, debe ser lavado y desinfectado diariamente. Las mascarillas hechas en casa no son un sustituto aceptable del distanciamiento social.” Para más información sobre como prevenir la transmisión de coronavirus en entornos agrícolas: Ingles:   https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-000.pdf
Español: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-165-999.pdf  Llame a L&I para una consulta gratuita: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/preventing-injuries-illnesses/request-consultation/consultant-near-you 
R: “Los empleadores deben asegurar que todos los empleados mantengan al menos una distancia de seis pies entre ellos y entre el público siempre que sea posible.” “Sugerencias alternativas para protecciones obligatorias cuando el distanciamiento de seis pies no es factible: -Usar barreras físicas entre trabajadores para bloquear la transmisión directa cara-a-cara. -Usar ventilación de presión negativa en zonas de respiración de los empleados en lugares fijos de trabajo. -Proveer y exigir el uso de mascarillas comerciales como mascarillas desechables de uso no médico. Estas mascarillas, deben usarse en combinación con otras barreras físicas, de ingeniería y/o controles administrativos. Para mayor  información sobre cómo prevenir la transmisión del coronavirus en líneas de procesamiento y almacenamiento de alimentos: Inglés: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-166-000.pdf Español: https://www.lni.wa.gov/forms-publications/F414-166-999.pdf Llame a L&I para una consulta gratuita: https://lni.wa.gov/safety-health/preventing-injuries-illnesses/request-consultation/consultant-near-you
   
R: Contacte a un proveedor de atención medica local y a su autoridad local de salud pública: https://www.doh.wa.gov/AboutUs/PublicHealthSystem/LocalHealthJurisdictions